The Best Baby Boomer Exercise

As a baby boomer, how often have you wondered what the very best exercise is for you to do on a regular basis? The question is important because most of us don’t want to exercise – just for the sake of exercise – any more than reasonably necessary. This means selecting exercises that are effective and time efficient. So what is the best baby boomer exercise?

I was intrigued when I saw this headline on an article published at Mark’s Daily Apple: “The Best Exercise There is, Hands Down”

I discovered when I read the article that the title was slightly misleading (which puts the title of this post in the same category).

The article does discuss a handful of different exercises as recommended by different experts. For example, the plank is offered up by the AARP as the ultimate full body core development exercise. I suppose there is a lot of truth in this because during the two years I worked with a personal trainer, I spent a lot of time and energy in the plank position. Many standard yoga routines, including Sun Salutation which I do most mornings, include movements into and out of the plank.

Even a recent article from Dr. Mercola featured the plank as one of three tests to assess your general fitness. The plank test is based on your ability to maintain the plank position for at least two minutes. I can do it, which is a relief. (BTW – the world record of 80 minutes is owned by a 50+ guy!) One of the other general fitness tests is the sitting-rising test that I wrote about last year.

So did Mark conclude that the plank is the best exercise for us? Not exactly.

Mark fooled us somewhat because he didn’t single out a specific exercise. Instead, his conclusion is that the best exercise for you (and for anyone else) is the exercise that you will actually do!

Before you tune out on this, read Mark’s logic which is science based:

One reason is consistency: adherence begets success. You don’t get stronger or fitter or leaner because of a single workout. You get stronger or fitter or leaner because of the cumulative effect of many, many workouts done on a consistent basis. Search the literature for research on exercise adherence and you won’t find much about the “benefits of exercise adherence” because the benefits are accepted as basic law. They’re implicit. You will instead find dozens of studies that seek to figure out the best way to promote adherence in various populations, because adherence is the most important factor in an exercise program’s effectiveness.

This means the best exercises for me are walking and yoga because I engage in these activities almost every day. Do I need to do more? Absolutely. But I need to add things that will stay with me.

Here is a link to the full article:  The Best Exercise There Is, Hands Down | Mark’s Daily Apple.


Comments

  1. says

    “One reason is consistency: adherence begets success. You don’t get stronger or fitter or leaner because of a single workout. You get stronger or fitter or leaner because of the cumulative effect of many, many workouts done on a consistent basis.” – This. I couldn’t have said it any better. It really boils down to how determined you are in achieving your goals so before you start, ask yourself first.

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